How to grow potatoes in containers

How to grow potatoes in containers

Potatoes don’t need to be grown in the vegetable garden. If you are short of garden space, they can easily be grown in large containers.

Whatever you choose, it needs to be able to hold a generous amount of compost to allow the potato tubers to develop and good drainage is essential.

The Unwins Potato Bag is specifically designed to grow three seed potatoes. This will generate a substantial crop of potatoes. It’s ideal if you are new to vegetable growing and want to have a go and is also great for kids. Buy them one each and challenge the heaviest crop!

Growing potatoes in container is perfect if you only have a small garden, terrace or even a balcony.

Step 1

Place a generous layer of Gro-Sure Vegetable Compost into the bottom of the potato bag or container.

Position 3 chitted seed potatoes on top of the compost and cover over with 10-15cm (4-6 inches) of compost.

Add some Growmore Fertiliser as a base dressing to give the plants a boost when growing.

Step 2

Water the tubers and keep the compost moist but not saturated.

The plants will start to root and shoot and leaves will push through the compost layer.

When this happens, cover over the shoots with a new layer of 10cm (4 inches) of fresh Gro-Sure Vegetable Compost.

Repeat this process until the potato bag or container is almost full.

When the leaves are 20cm above the bag, start feeding, add another dose of Growmore or Westland Organic Potato & Vegetable Feed.

Another feed can be added a couple of weeks later to make sure your potatoes have adequate nutrients available.

Step 3

When the flowers on the potato plant start to drop it is usually a sign that your potatoes are about ready for harvesting. The longer you leave your potatoes, the larger they will be and the bigger the yield.  A good guide is 12 weeks for salads and 22 weeks for maincrops – but this will vary depending on the season.

Carefully remove the potato plant and wash the potatoes ready for use.

Store potatoes in a cool, dark, frost-free place.

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