Storing your crops

Storing your crops

Many gardeners harvest bumper crops and find that at the end of the growing season they are left with a glut that they cannot use up fast enough.

With all crops, only store those that are in prime condition. Any damaged crops can easily spread disease to others, ruining the whole harvest.

Follow our top tips for storing fruit and veg effectively and extending the life of home grown produce.

Apples

Wrap in tissue paper and store in a crate or on shelves allowing the air to circulate. Store in a cool and dark place.

Borlotti and French Beans

When the wet weather sets in, cut plants and hang upside down somewhere dry until pods and beans have dried. Collect beans and store in a dry container.

Carrots

Store unwashed carrots in crates of damp sand or in paper sacks to keep the light out.

Chilli Peppers

Pick any chillies left on the plant and dry in the oven on the lowest setting possible overnight.

Garlic

Pull up bulbs and dry for a couple of days in the sun before storing in a cool and dry place. Bulbs should remain in good condition for up to 4 months.

Onions

Pull up bulbs and dry for a couple of days in the sun. Onions can be stored in pairs of old tights knotted between bulbs

Pears

Wrap in tissue paper and store in a crate or on shelves allowing the air to circulate. Store in a cool and dark place.

Potatoes

Allow potatoes to dry for a couple of days in an airy but shady place before storing in Hessian or paper sacks. It is important to remove all trace of potatoes from the ground to prevent blight from occurring in subsequent years.

Shallots

Lift bulbs and dry for a couple of days in the sun before storing in nets.

Squash, Pumpkins and Gourds

If fruits are not ripe, place in a light place for a few days to allow them to continue to ripen. After this, store in a cool and dry place. They should store well throughout the winter months.

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